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Asking Again for Money

I’m applying for a grant that the nonprofit received last year.* I wrote last year’s grant, too. The easy thing would be to copy and paste last year’s information into this year’s application since little has changed in the foundation’s guidelines. Also, last year’s application worked, so why change it? This is the wrong thing[…]

Keeping Track of Time

When I’m writing a story, I try to maintain a consistent timeline. Even in science fiction, time progresses in a logical direction. The story can jump around, but the orderly passing of time should be maintained. This may seem obvious, yet I have read novels where the author confused the passage of time in the[…]

Important Jobs in a Nonprofit

This blog post continues a recent blog post about nonprofit positions. Nonprofit employees are categorized as operations (general overhead) or programs (specific to accomplishing the mission). I’m writing about the operations side since program people are unique to each nonprofit. The most important employee is the executive director. However, many nonprofits have no other operations[…]

Heroes Need Friends

Recently I listened to a podcast* where the guest speaker talked about characters. One thing the guest speaker said was that a hero** should not be a hero alone. Every hero needs others to help them do heroic stuff. I’ve read stories or watched shows where the hero took on the villain alone with maybe[…]

Professional versus Volunteer Grant Writer

There are two types of grant writers—someone paid by the nonprofit and one who is not (a volunteer). I’m a volunteer grant writer which means I provide my services without compensation. But I know professional grant writers who each formed a company and are paid for their services. Professional grant writers are paid either hourly[…]

Making Changes

I worked on a novel for several years until putting it away to work on other writing projects and grants. When I put it away, I had in my mind that it was a great novel. Over time, it became even greater. Two weeks ago, I decided to work on it for publication later this[…]

Finding Local Grants

A nonprofit has a better chance of a grant if the foundation has a presence in the area where the nonprofit is located and operates. When I’m out in local shopping areas, I note the names of chain stores.* At home, I put “foundation” at the end of the name and most times there’s a[…]

Do Readers Read Table of Contents?

A table of contents (ToC) is a tool for a reader to use as navigation within a book. They can read the story the writer wants to tell. It is also an organizational tool for the writer to help them categorize their material and keep it all straight. A ToC is best used in nonfiction[…]

One Degree of Separation—The Grant Writer

Writing grants is not about the grant writer. Yes, they do the writing, which is important. But a grant writer also connects the people in the foundation with the nonprofit and vice versa. With the application, many times this is the first contact between the two organizations. It should be like a handshake and not[…]

To Tell a Story or To Learn

Some people think the purpose of creative writing is to tell a story, while a grant writer is to explain what the project is about. One is to entertain while the other is to teach. This is true, but the opposite is also important. I think creative writing and writing grants are linked by the[…]

Yes or No to Matching Grants

Some foundations and government organizations require grant recipients to match the grant funding one-to-one. As an example, if a nonprofit is approved for $10,000, they must have another $10,000 before getting the grant money. The good news about matching grants is less competition. Many nonprofits will not try for the matching funds. The bad news[…]

The Long and Short of Things

This blog will help creative writers and grant writers. It is about the length of a chapter, whether in a story or a grant. Editors talk about varying the size of sentences and paragraphs to maintain tempo or pacing. Shorter sentences and paragraphs increase the pace while longer ones slow things down. The opposite is[…]

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