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Three Phases of the Self-Published Book

So as not to leave anyone in suspense, the three phases are: (1) writing a book, (2) publishing it, and (3) marketing. I discovered (like everyone else) that each phase requires vastly different expertise. Also, each expertise can be used only for that phase which makes things even more troublesome. What I learned from writing[…]

Changes in the Nonprofit – Be Positive

Grant writers, like myself, may not be part of the nonprofit’s staff or on the board. Therefore, it is important for grant writers to keep up on significant changes to the staff or board members who can create changes to grants already submitted. I put a lot of time and work into submitting grants. It[…]

Writing Something Different

After publishing my novel, I went back to writing short stories for a brief time. I’m doing this to help my creativity. Writing a novel takes most people a long time. During this time, the writer can become immersed in the story, plot, and characters. Also, many writers go on to the next novel that[…]

Let’s Have a Grant Writing Party

When I’m writing a grant, I prefer to have as many people in the nonprofit helping as I can. Diversity is a good thing all the time. Yet, too many times the nonprofit staff and managers provide little input. While I encourage them to be involved in putting the application together, I just receive smiles.[…]

Self-Published Print Book and Booksellers

Things are simple for self-published ebooks. The author sets the price and the publishing company takes their share. For print, the author must choose what discount to give booksellers (30-55%) and whether to allow returns or not. If allowing returns, the bookseller can send books back for a refund. The author pays the refund. What[…]

How To Manage Grant Time

Time is an important factor for a grant writer. First is the figuring when to look for grants. I start with when a nonprofit is normally low on cash. I look over the nonprofit’s bank account over the last three years that shows cash flow and I take out unusual events like a natural disaster.[…]

Two and a Half Ways to Plan a Story

Pantsers* write a story with only a general thought of how their story should go. On the opposite side are plotters who outline their story, sometimes in detail. I think most writers are half way between these two and use both techniques to craft their story based on how they write. When starting off, most[…]

Getting Help Writing Grants

What I’ve learned from self-publishing my book is for me to stop trying to do everything myself and get help. The same applies toward grant writing. Grant writers need writing skills to complete a grant application. Yet, there are other parts to an application besides the summaries, narratives, and other written sections. Grant writers should[…]

Self-Publish or Bust

After several months attempting to self-publish, I hired someone to do the interior formatting and another person to do the cover. While some authors hire someone to also do the uploads, I wanted to do this and control something of the process. Of course, my first attempts to upload the files failed. This is when[…]

A Picture is Worth a Thousand Words

I know, the title is an old cliché. Don’t worry, I won’t use any more clichés. This blog is about adding photographs into a grant request. Many grant applications have an “other” category, meaning the applicant has the option of providing additional information. (If given the opportunity to provide more information, always provide more information.)[…]

What readers look for first in a book

The aim of publishing is to get someone to read what is published. The author will not know the reader, so what can they do to motivate someone to look at their book? People in the publishing business say the cover is what attracts readers first. I disagree. For many years I conducted an informal,[…]

Grant Updates

This is an update on two grant projects I recently blogged about. The first, “Getting Emergency Grant Money” involved a nonprofit that was renovating an historic building and experienced a sudden problem. Work stopped for two weeks while experts evaluated the situation and permissions were renewed. During this time, the nonprofit contacted a local foundation[…]

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