Teamwork on a Grant

The majority of my grant writing I do alone. Certainly not my choice. I gather information and data from the nonprofit, ask for help, get a “no,” and write the grant myself. However, I recently joined a nonprofit team to write a grant.

It was great. A leader was assigned (not me), people were energetic about providing information (almost unheard of), and my workload as a volunteer was significantly reduced (yeah!).

I didn’t mind putting the grant package together or doing some of the narrative writing because the team members helped. This is what volunteer grant writing should be about—the paid staff helping the person not getting paid.

Of course, not all teamwork is great. Teams can be as dysfunctional as some families. I think the key is motivation. Everyone should feel they are contributing to the final product.

While working on a grant, most of the time I look to the nonprofit staff to help. I don’t ask them to be team members because they may run away. I ask them for information and data. I try to get them to read over what I wrote. I make them secret team members. It’s a secret to them that they are on a team.

I think teams have a greater chance of success to get a grant than one person doing everything. More mistakes are made by one person. Also, only one viewpoint gets presented. Yet, nonprofits usually have one person doing all the grant writing. This can be the executive director, paid staff like the volunteer coordinator, or a volunteer.

Everyone has talent and fault. One person is good or bad in one area and another the opposite. I prefer the team concept because I am certainly do not always have the right solution.

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