A Nonprofit’s Turnover Rate

A turnover of staff (employees leave and are replaced) greater than forty percent over a six month period is not good for any organization and can be critical to nonprofits. This should be a warning sign to grant writers that it may be difficult working with the nonprofit.

A high turnover can mean a continuous change in mission direction, different goals, redirected priorities, and always new people to work with. Sometimes nonprofits need this change and it is understandable that staff leave as a result. It is important that the grant writer know why so many people leave.

Besides a planned overhaul of the nonprofit, the most common reasons staff leave can be underpay, no upward mobility, and excessive workloads. However, I think people who work for a nonprofit do so because they believe in the mission. They want to stay despite the low pay or even working conditions and it takes a lot of negativity to discourage them to leave.

While negativity can come from other employees, I find that staff leave more because board members overstep their authority and/or the executive director’s lack of leadership.

A grant writer may try to change this situation. However, if they decide to get involved, they are not writing grants and have assumed a different role in the nonprofit. Eventually, the leadership leaves and/or the nonprofit fails. That is when the grant writer is most needed.

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