A Picture is Worth a Thousand Words

I know, the title is an old cliché. Don’t worry, I won’t use any more clichés. This blog is about adding photographs into a grant request.

Many grant applications have an “other” category, meaning the applicant has the option of providing additional information. (If given the opportunity to provide more information, always provide more information.) I add pamphlets or posters or something linking back to the project. I always try to include at least one photograph.

The photograph(s) should involve people doing something directly related to the project. If requesting money for a product, show how that product is helping people. If needing funds for a service, show people receiving that service. The photograph should show the nonprofit making an impact to those in need.

However, be careful with photographs. Everyone looks at them differently. Some photographs can hurt the grant request.

For example, a service like a soup kitchen should show many people being served and not an empty cafeteria with one person. If asking money for a product, show it being used and not sitting on a table where it could look insignificant.

For a renovation project I’m helping with, I show contrasts of what the building looked like and the progress being made. It is important to be truthful, but I do not show the best side needing renovation. Someone may think the building doesn’t look all that bad. Also, I do not show a close up of rotted wood. People may think the building is too far gone and the money will be wasted.

So, just don’t send photographs. Think as much about the photographs as writing the grant. After all, a picture is worth a thousand words. (I didn’t say I wouldn’t use the same cliché.)

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