Author Archive: Stanley

Anti-Clean Language

This blog post is about writers using profanity (obscenity, swearing, cussing, etc.). Are these words necessary in a story?

I think some profane words are all right in a novel if the words are part of the character’s personality. When a writer uses profanity everywhere, the novel is about the writer expressing a particular side of their personality. It’s not about the story.

I do not read books with excessive profanity (or graphic violence, I have the evening news for that). I think too much profanity pollutes the story with wordiness. The use of profanity can distract a reader and become a list of profane words without purpose.

Also, I find too much profanity boring. Yeah, the writer knows a lot of swear words, but can they write anything else? A writer who focuses on profane words is not focusing on the story.

If a writer uses profanity, how far should they go in the selection of words? I resent writers who use words that are anti-religious, racist, provoke ridicule, or are derogatory. Even if they keep within the character, I think this is unnecessary. If a writer wants the reader to know this about the character, they should do that in the story through active voice.

Profanity should not be the focus of the story. It should be the characters, plot, story line, and other elements in the story that make a good telling. Of course, there are readers who enjoy excessive profanity and do not care about the choice of words. That is not for me.

I’m interested in the story, plot, and characters. I enjoy word usage, style, and technique. Qualities I have never found in a novel with a list of profane words.

Steps in the grant writing process

These step-by-step procedures provide the basic processes to follow when writing grants.

A grant writer should only follow these steps after they have fully understood the nonprofit’s organization, their mission, and specific needs. A nonprofit should only follow this list if they are organized, have a mission, and know what their specific needs are.

In these procedures, there’s not much writing, a lot of preparing to write, and some work afterward if the grant is accepted. The first half of the list is the grant writer, the second half is the nonprofit.

The List

1. Conduct research and find a foundation that meets the nonprofit’s mission and needs
2. Once a foundation is found, learn more about it through further research
3. After further research, contact the foundation for more information
4. Read, more than once, the details of the grant application and research found. Make notes of keywords repeated.
5. Gather nonprofit data for the application
6. Write the application
7. Have at least one person read the application as an editor
8. Check everything over
9. Submit
10. Do not contact the foundation. Wait to hear from them.
11. If the foundation rejects the application, call and find out why for next time
12. If the foundation accepts, thank them immediately
13. Get reporting details and restrictions (if any) on spending the money
14. Receive the money
15. Spend the money
16. Report on the money to the foundation

A grant writer is responsible for steps 1 to 8 or just before submission of the grant application. The rest of the list, from submission to final reporting, is the responsibility of the nonprofit.

A grant writer should never be involved in the receipt of the money or reporting how it was spent. I will go into why on the next post about grant writing (in two weeks).

Learning is Forever

Writing is putting letters into words, extending the words into sentences, and ending it all in a series of paragraphs. Hopefully, so it all makes sense. Like I try to do with this blog each week. Writing is certainly not an easy thing to do.

A lot of things are not easy for me to do, but with writing I take the time to learn how to do it better. The more I learn, the easier it seems to get (or it appears to me that way). I think it is the same with any skill.

To learn how to write better, a person needs to make the decision they want to write better. This goes back to a previous blog post about motivation. A person, on their own, should want their writing to be understood by as many readers as possible.

This means a writer should continually learn the craft of writing. Just like construction workers adapting to new regulations and tools, a writer must keep up with the latest trends and technology. This is what makes writers successful. This is what stops writers from being understood.

As an example, some still put two spaces after a period, do not accept the Oxford comma, and use gender speech incorrectly. They do not accept that long paragraphs are out, white space on a page is in, and everything must be mobile ready. While they may have learned writing rules using a computer, that may have been twenty years ago.

Keeping up with the latest writing trends and technology makes writing even harder. Yet, like any craft, if a person has motivated themselves to be better, it would be easy to keep up.

Writing Grants is Writing

I blog about creative writing and grant writing because I do both and I see a lot of similarities.

In creative writing, a writer needs to know how to write. This may seem obvious, yet many people take on grant writing without believing there are writing rules to follow.

Before drafting a grant request, the writer needs to achieve a level of understanding about writing. Such as how to use active voice, minimize the number of adverbs, and how to compile sentence structure.

Once there, a grant writer can improve their writing by re-reading what they wrote and being critical of their words. After this, the grant writer should get others to read what was written. A grant writer needs to accept critique and be open to criticism from themselves and others.

Of course, understanding writing and how to critique applies to all types of writing. This is important for a grant request because it involves funding for a nonprofit. A writer can use an intended way that is clear and simple or put something on paper just to get it submitted in time.

Ignoring the rules about writing leads to a grant request that might not make sense and a waste of time for everyone. If a writer puts in the effort and work to write a grant request, they should want to make sure other people can understand what was written.