Author Archive: Stanley

We’ll Meet Again

I recently finished a Saturday morning, six week grant writing class at the local community college. The teacher had a good, outgoing personality and was informative, being a professional grant writer for several years.

Not the teacher’s fault, but I didn’t learn a lot since I’ve been writing grants for a while. It was a good class anyway, since I met other grant writers or grant writers-to-be. This is important.

Finding people who do what you do. People who might give some help when needed or who you could help. I certainly could always use help.

Even though the class ended and everyone went their separate ways, like the song “We’ll Meet Again”, you never know when you’ll meet again. “Don’t know where, don’t know when.”

Three things about a character’s name

A name means someone existed who meant something to another person. Names are important in life and in a story.

1. A name should mean something to the character (and reader)
When I read a name in a story, I expect something out of that character. I want to see what happens to the named person and what part they play in the story. When I’ve read enough and find that a writer has named people and never mentioned them again, I stop reading. Naming every character just because they are in a scene makes me wonder who is important. Maybe none of them.

2. Way Too Many Names
Some writers believe the more names, the better the story. I quickly become lost as to who is who. How many characters should be named in a story? Not that many. I like for named characters to be developed in some manner. To do this with a lot of names can only result in a story filled with character sketches and no story.

3. Characters with similar names
Each name should be unique in some way. As an example, if several names start with the same first three or four letters, it is difficult to keep them all straight in my head. The first couple of letters are mind catching and should be different and as unique as the characters. My mind is not caught when too many names sound the same.

What’s in a name?
I use the term “name” loosely here. Really, it is any title given to a character in a story. It doesn’t have to be their name, but could be a title like “detective”. I picture three levels of characters:
• Those with names who have some significant part in the story.
• Unnamed people who are described in some detail and generally have a title. These characters may appear in several scenes before disappearing. They add to the story.
• Unnamed and briefly mentioned characters are mostly for only one scene and can be important for the atmosphere they provide.

A name should help develop the character’s personality and give the reader a reason to keep reading. A name should be treated with care because it is what is remembered. Just like in real life, a name identifies who is who.

Relationships

Every grant writer and staff from a nonprofit should take time to meet each other in person. This may sound like ancient advice since social media lets people keep their distance. But, people build a better relationship not by throwing electrons at each other across cyberspace.

A personal visit does two things:

  • Gives the grant writer an opportunity to tour the facility and meet the people working and supporting the organization. The grant writer can also get to know the community being served.
  • The nonprofit has a chance to understand what the grant writer can provide and if there could be a relationship. In the end, it is the grant writer who can go away and the nonprofit is left with the results.

Just like everywhere, there are good and bad people. The internet has shown that bad people can find good people and vice versa. Meeting in person can help both sides figure out who is who.

If a grant writer and nonprofit staff cannot meet, at least do video conferencing. And, do it once a week because a monitor is not quite the same as face-to-face (again ancient concept that worked well in the past).

I think that the most important thing about grant writing are the relationships. These should include not only grant writers and nonprofits, but the people providing the funding or other resource.

Many foundations want a conversation. They want a relationship with the nonprofit staff and a grant writer should help bring the two together. A foundation should not be seen as a source of money, but people who want to invest in the nonprofit’s mission.

Really, all of this grant writing is not about the papers and processes, but about people talking to each other. I’ve been working on getting people money for years and it all comes down to relationships and shared views.

Communicate, write, and submit. But, talk about it with all the people involved.

That old argument: Self Publishing vs Traditional Publishing

 

I had another blog planned. However, I’ve been listening to self-publishing podcasts and traditional publishing came up as it usually does.

I think there is merit in both and some people agree since there are hybrid publishing systems combining the two. However, the biggest advantage to self-publishing is that a well written book has a venue toward being read. There is less chance in traditional publishing.

The merger of the publication industry narrowed the book selection process with fewer people doing the selecting and fewer venues for authors to sell in. Also, publishers took less risk by using just a few plot lines. Readers’ choices declined while publishers compensated by using marketing ploys like best seller lists that did not really list best sellers. I’ve heard many readers who selected a best seller and wondered why, after reading it, that it was ever published.

Agents are not at fault because they need to select books editors want. Editors must select what is quickly profitable or get fired. Corporate management will not adjust leaving the decision for change up to the reader.

My goal has always been to look elsewhere than best seller lists and the big five publishing companies for something to read. Going to the other end with self-publishing is usually not good, either. There are too many self-published books of poor quality. At least books traditionally published are readable.

I seek out small, independent presses. This is where I have found books rich in diversity and vivid story telling that could become classics. While hybrid publishing helps improve self-published authors, these presses are where a well written book has a chance to being read for a long time.

Given all of this, I’m likely to self-publish my books. I’d rather not, but it’s fruitless to pursue an agent because my books do not fit the standard plot line. I’d like to find an independent publisher, but they are hard to find in my genre (hint: become more recognized). Instead, I will professionally edit my books and put them out there. Maybe one day, someone on a podcast will talk about my book. I hope it’s a podcast I listen to.