creative writing

Stories without a Published Home (showing half published, half not)

Sometimes after sending a story out for publishing and getting a lot of rejections, I decide enough is enough. For my sake and the story.

I feel guilty when I stop sending out a short story. It is a strange ending to what I created. No one will ever read it except me.

I keep my stories printed out and in manila folders. Inside on the left are magazines I sent the story to along with date and when it was rejected (or when I never heard back from the magazine).

One folder has red wine stains, another splotches of strong coffee, and still another drips from black tea. Some are peppered with food stains while others are not so anointed (it didn’t take as long to write them).

When I run out of room on the inside cover, I write the rejections on the back. At some point, I stop and file the folder and story away before I run out of room on the back and there’s nowhere else to go.

These stories I file away don’t sit far from the stories that were accepted. Maybe I’ll bring the old stories out and try again one day.

Leo Tolstoy’s “Art is an Infection”

Brenda Ueland wrote about Tolstoy in her 1938 book If You Want to Write. Tolstoy believed, “the artist has a feeling and he expresses it and at once this feeling infects other people and they have it, too.”

Ms. Ueland explained that when an artist exhibits feelings “honestly and courageously” onto a canvas, through music, in writing, or some other venue and means, the artist infects the creation with passion. Through this, the artist brings emotion to the viewer, listener, or reader who experiences it within themselves.

Is this what an artist should strive for? An infection of their feelings in their work? Or, should they just produce something that makes them money?

Of course, it is not possible for everyone to be infected by an artist’s work. Also, artists do not always succeed infecting their work with passion and honesty. Some don’t even try and see their work as a product to be sold.

This is all right because some buyers only want a distraction in their life or a decoration to be ignored. Besides, making something honestly and courageously takes time. An artist can make more products (and money) if they don’t spend a lot of effort in their creation.

It’s too bad because Ms. Ueland thought that, when an artist tells what they truly feel, the infection could become universal. “Everybody understands it and at once.” I think today we call that going viral.

I think an artist should strive, at least one time in their life, to create an art they will always love. Something they want the world to witness, an infection of their honesty and courageousness, passion and emotion. Even if it may not become a classic at first.

Starting Off and Writing to the End

People in the writing business talk about how important it is to grab a reader’s attention at the start of a story. Yet, the beginning, middle, and end all make the story. The catchy beginning is only remembered by what followed.

As an example, Moby-Dick’s opening line, “Call me Ishmael,” is considered a memorable beginning. However, if a reader never heard of the book, the line is meaningless. It is famous only because of what followed.

After reading a story, I have no clue what the first line said. I remember more the middle and end rather than the beginning. I think a story can recover from an okay beginning, but not a so-so middle and ending.

Catchy beginnings are pushed more in the commercial industry who largely do not care if the story falls apart soon after it starts. The reader has already been caught in a purchase. As for readers, some give up on a book if the beginning drags on. They worry too soon that it may foretell the rest of the story.

In a book about writing I read that, if a writer thinks a device of words is necessary to insure the story is read, the story is better not to be written at all.

I write the beginning of a story without thinking about a catchy anything. I think the start of a story should be with the expectation that a buildup with an end is coming. The start should be done in a natural way with the development of the story.

Not long after I write the beginning of a story, I write the ending. It gives me something to aim for, even if I probably change the ending when I get there. Probably the beginning, too.

I just make sure the beginning and end connect with the middle, which is enough for a story.

It takes time to create

In my attempt at being a published short story writer, I try to spend more time being creative and less time finding a home for my stories. Finding a magazine to send my short stories to can take a lot of time.

Over the years, I used sources such as Duotrope (costs to subscribe, but worth it), Poets and Writers Literary Magazines database (free, but please subscribe to their great magazine), and the annual Writers Digest Novel & Short Story Writer’s Market. Using these sources saves time from randomly searching the internet.

I also use a spreadsheet I created with over 250 magazines who publish stories similar to what I write (see the blog post “Keeping Track of Things). The spreadsheet doubles as a way to keep track of the stories I send out.

After I narrow down my search to a few magazines, I go to the magazine’s website for more information.

I read what the magazine has published, the editors’ biographies, their mission statements, and submission requirements. One of the most important items is meeting the word count. I stay at least 500 words below their maximum number of words because shorter is generally better.

When I finally pick a magazine, I follow the submission process exactly. I don’t want my story rejected because of a technicality. And, the most important part of the process is spelling the editor’s name correctly.

What this is all about is the expense of time. Writing and getting published are about many things, including writing a good story. Having enough time to do this creativity and finding someone to like what is written is important.