publishing

What readers look for first in a book

The aim of publishing is to get someone to read what is published. The author will not know the reader, so what can they do to motivate someone to look at their book?

People in the publishing business say the cover is what attracts readers first. I disagree. For many years I conducted an informal, haphazard, non-scientific survey of asking people I knew what attracted them to a book. Very few people said the cover convinced them to look at a book.

My survey group had a list of things they looked at first when considering a book. This included the author’s name, the genre, book reviews, and maybe the blurb. I also consider these things when looking for a book.

While blurbs are important, they are two or more paragraphs and the second thing I look at when selecting a book. I don’t look at book reviews. It’s a lot of trouble finding them and, besides, they are a stranger’s opinion.

As a reader, I look in the genre that interests me. This helps me narrow the search, but for an author their book is sitting there among many other books. On occasion I will look for an author’s name. However, I would have already read at least one of their books.

What attracts me and sometimes my survey group was the title of the book.

A few words across the front cover are the first thing people read. They may glance at the cover, adore the colors, but an interesting title will attract a reader’s interest.

P.S. I will post in two weeks my continued efforts to publish on IngramSpark. Alliance for Independent Authors gave me advice that helped.

Cover Problems, Again

I attempted to upload my novel to IngramSparks so I would have a wider distribution for my novel High School Rocket Science (For Extraterrestrial Use Only). That meant my book would be available to other markets outside of Amazon. I had one success.

With my KDP version, I had line spacing of 1.5 inches and an okay font. For IngramSparks, I tried 1.15, which was too small. I ended with 1.25 which was good. I also uploaded to IngramSparks using a different font. The text looked better. I was still at 335 pages, which was my goal.

Like with KDP, the cover stopped me. Somehow, I ended up with multiple images on the same cover with no way out. There did not seem to be a way to delete and try again. Obviously, I took a path that I should not have traveled. When the frustration grew, I decided to send a message for help and put it all aside.

At least for a few days. In the meantime, I had a grant to submit. Of course, I am still waiting for a reply from IngramSparks (hope dies last).

This week I will ask a writing group I belong to for help. The Alliance for Independent Authors is a good source that I should take advantage of and not be concerned about seeming too inept.

Writing seems to be more about getting knocked down and getting up again.

Pushing Toward Publication, Again

My blog post from two weeks ago exclaimed I would, “. . . work on uploading a new book size and cover into IngramSparks publishing.” My plan was to blog about this experience.

I did work on a new book size, but it was a pitiful amount of effort. My excuse I gave myself: I was finishing another book, which I really was doing. Yet, the real reason is that I’m overcome with caution about making my book available to more people. What would these people think about it?

The caution is stifling my motivation.

Without marketing, in KDP no one will look at my book. There are too many being published every day there. I may not find any readers on other publishing platforms, either. Why should I worry what people thing about my book when there may not be any readers to do that thinking?

I apologize for this being a whiny blog post. I have another two weeks when I hope to be blogging about my work on uploading a new book size and cover into IngramSparks publishing.

That sounds familiar. I think I might have heard it before.