writing business

I did not form an LLC

In a previous blog post, I stated how I was forming a limited liability company (LLC) to publish my books. For the LLC, I completed the short application and long operating agreement, then decided to see what the wizard Google had to say about all of this (you would think I would have done this first).

I originally got the idea from podcasts and articles by authors who publish multiple books. They made me think it would be a good idea to start off self-publishing under the umbrella of a company. “Treat your writing like a business,” they proclaimed.

From my advisor Google, I found articles from authors and others who questioned the advantages of an LLC. At least for beginning authors. Most people publish under a sole proprietorship, meaning they are personally responsible and liable for everything.

Forming a company does not necessarily isolate an author from liability. However, liability was not the reason I considered an LLC.

It was to help me be serious about self-publishing and treat it like a business. I rethought my decision after one author wrote about the need for beginning authors to minimize expenses.

Forming an LLC in North Carolina cost $125. The annual report (really a tax) is $200 a year. This also got me thinking about complications since every year I would need to file a report (and the tax forms!).

Self-publishing is already complicated enough. Did I really want to add to my already complicated self-publishing attempt with managing an LLC?

I decided not to form one. I’ll still treat my self-publishing like a business. However, first I’ll get my books published and see where that goes. Hopefully, someone will read what I wrote.

A New Year

Since this is the last post for 2018, I have resolutions for 2019. This is a surprise to me since I don’t make resolutions. If I start or stop something, I do it when I’m ready and not wait for a specific date. If I did wait, I’d probably forget what I was planning to start or stop.

One resolution is to continue blogging. This is my 48th blog post and I know this because I number each file. Otherwise, I’d have to do a lot of counting. I plan to continue this blog, alternating between grant writing and creative writing, as I do now since it shows I’m consistent at something.

The other resolution is to get at least one book self-published. I would prefer getting an agent, yet I do not have enough Facebook likes or Twitter followers and I don’t do Instagram or other social media sites. Per a popular literary agent, social media connections are more important than what is written. Mainly, I’ll self publish because I’ve already querying many agents without success.

To start the self-publishing path, I’m setting up a limited liability company in a few weeks. I’ve read and listened to a lot of people about self-publishing and this is the path I’ve chosen. It also includes getting an editor and someone to help with this website since I keep forgetting what I taught myself.

Self-publishing is time consuming, so I freed up time by resigning from some of my volunteering duties. I was getting way too involved in way too many things, anyway. I learned that having enough time to do things leads to a better chance of success.

In 2019, I’ll focus on the volunteering that I feel good about and helps more people. With the extra time I have, I’ll send myself off into the self-publishing world.

No Response from Editors and Agents

I submit short stories to magazine editors with the vague hope they’ll accept my work. I have hope until my story is rejected (hope turns to shock/surprise when accepted). I have the same hope when I query an agent for my young adult novel (there’s no acceptance, yet).

The worse part of submitting a story or a query is the “no response” position editors and agents take. Some agents will at least say that, if I did not hear from them, they were not interested. I still wait and, after a hundred days, decide they will not respond like they said they wouldn’t.

A few magazine editors say the same (don’t wait for a response), although I do. Some editors say to query them if there is no response. I used to do that and I always received a nasty email to stop bothering them. They put in more effort to respond to me like that than it would have taken to send a form rejection.

I realize people can be overwhelmed with submissions, yet it does not take much to send, at least, a standard form rejection. Most editors and agents have assistants or interns reading the submissions, anyway.

I think, to not respond at all, shows a lack of respect for writers as if they are not worth a reply. When I record on my spreadsheet “no response” from an editor or agent, I tell myself to take them off future submission lists.

Of course, the editor or agent could have lost my story or query. And, I am not immune from making mistakes in my submissions. This is why I will probably send another submission contradicting any advice I might have just gave myself.