writing techniques

Using Artificial Intelligence (AI) in Writing

AI software is increasingly being used in many areas of writing as more of these tools are developed and improved upon.

Currently, the most effective AI software tools are for editing. And they are getting better and better. But even with a good editing AI tool, a human editor is still needed.

To me, using AI for editing is like when I went from a typewriter to a computer to write. Editing AI tools make my writing clearer, more in line with standard US English practices (i.e. punctuation), and highlights my weaknesses (I have some bad habits). In the competitive world of grant writing or publishing a story, AI can be a benefit like using a computer rather than a typewriter.

I would encourage grant and creative writers to invest in some type of AI software tool for their editing. Even some professional human editors are using these tools. And the use of AI will continue to grow. One day AI may even write grants or stories with the human used only for the final editing.

As an example, AI is already being used in news media to find and summarize internet articles for publication. The AI searches for patterns and popularity and then produces and distributes this data in a summary. Journalists and editors review the summaries for the final news article.

AI will continue to improve and become more of a needed asset for writing and publishing. Just like one day when we might go from typing to using voice recognition or even reading our thoughts to write with.

What do you think about using AI?

P.S. If anyone wants to know what software tool I use, send me a comment or an email.

Writing in a Diary

For me, writing in a diary is a stress relief. My diary takes less work to express myself to me than writing something for other people to understand.

And, I listen to myself when I write to me. If I tell something to someone, they may not be listening or understanding. Writing in a diary could also be called free writing. It encourages creativity.

I think people should keep a diary. It is like having a conversation without talking to anyone. For me, the process and act of writing in a diary creates a sense of order in my thoughts, like it could for other people. It can certainly help anyone who needs to be a friend to themselves.

What I write in my diary is not what I would write in a journal.

A diary exposes deeper thoughts and it is easier to write out my thoughts. I think many writers create a journal instead of a diary. They are careful with what they write, believing that people would want to read their words one day or fearful that someone would read their words one day.

There are options. A writer can keep a journal and a diary. Let people read the journal and they will not look for a diary. Whichever way you go, the purpose of a diary and a journal is to communicate with yourself honestly.

If you are not writing a diary or journal, try it out. You certainly do not have to do it every day or even on a schedule (I don’t). You can write in a notebook or pieces of paper when you have the need and/or desire to talk to yourself.

If you are keeping a diary, that’s pretty good.

Writing Needs Editing and Vice Versa

Over the years of writing and editing, then more editing and more writing, I learned to get rid of words that I wrote and just did not fit. I send them into oblivion with a push of the delete key. Or, into a parallel universe where my better alter-self turns them into the best seller I missed making them into in this universe.

I see editing as a learning process many writers go through to know when words should be replaced with something that may or may not be as good as the original. Yes, second guessing defines writing and editing.

I hear the mantra, “Don’t be married to your words.” But, can the original, that your ego said was once great, be worse than what your pride is telling you to get rid of? That is the dilemma.

I try to create something that is the best I could create at that moment in time. Since I am always learning; what I wrote in the past reads a lot better after I edit with what I know in the present. This is what I keep telling myself and, most of the time, it is true. Editing is my mantra.

So, I have gotten better at getting rid of words that I liked but did not fit in with the story. It has been a process.

Long ago I used to work my story around words that I liked rather than deleting the words and continuing with the story. I eventually lost the argument with myself and decided to take the words out. Yet, I could not delete them, so I saved them in another document.

Looking back at what I saved brought me to my next phase of editing. Now, I just delete the words and move on.

How to Self Edit (my method)

I have been through many drafts of my young adult, science fiction novel High School Rocket Science (For Extraterrestrial Use Only). (Yes, I’m advertising the book.) In what I hope will be my final draft, I developed a self-editing method that seems to work for me:

  1. After printing the novel, I use a pencil to mark changes chapter by chapter.
  2. As I finish a few chapters, I update each one in MS Word.
  3. I go through several slow reads of each chapter on the computer screen until I no longer find things to change.
  4. I review each chapter separately through MS Word’s Spelling & Grammar, Grammarly, and ProWritingAid. (The last two are by subscription.)

This self-editing method is a multi-dimensional way to help me find errors I missed in past edits. It lets me look at my novel in three different ways:

  • paper copy
  • computer screen
  • through a software program

This self-editing method is designed for final drafts. I previously had my novel edited by a critique group and I paid a developmental editor. I realize I am getting more benefit from my current editing method.

My error is that I should have completed editing using this method before having another person look at my novel. I feel the advice from the critique group and the paid editor has been wasted since I am changing their edits to fit the changes I am making.

At least I’ll know for my next novel.