writing techniques

Writing Needs Editing and Vice Versa

Over the years of writing and editing, then more editing and more writing, I learned to get rid of words that I wrote and just did not fit. I send them into oblivion with a push of the delete key. Or, into a parallel universe where my better alter-self turns them into the best seller I missed making them into in this universe.

I see editing as a learning process many writers go through to know when words should be replaced with something that may or may not be as good as the original. Yes, second guessing defines writing and editing.

I hear the mantra, “Don’t be married to your words.” But, can the original, that your ego said was once great, be worse than what your pride is telling you to get rid of? That is the dilemma.

I try to create something that is the best I could create at that moment in time. Since I am always learning; what I wrote in the past reads a lot better after I edit with what I know in the present. This is what I keep telling myself and, most of the time, it is true. Editing is my mantra.

So, I have gotten better at getting rid of words that I liked but did not fit in with the story. It has been a process.

Long ago I used to work my story around words that I liked rather than deleting the words and continuing with the story. I eventually lost the argument with myself and decided to take the words out. Yet, I could not delete them, so I saved them in another document.

Looking back at what I saved brought me to my next phase of editing. Now, I just delete the words and move on.

How to Self Edit (my method)

I have been through many drafts of my young adult, science fiction novel High School Rocket Science (For Extraterrestrial Use Only). (Yes, I’m advertising the book.) In what I hope will be my final draft, I developed a self-editing method that seems to work for me:

  1. After printing the novel, I use a pencil to mark changes chapter by chapter.
  2. As I finish a few chapters, I update each one in MS Word.
  3. I go through several slow reads of each chapter on the computer screen until I no longer find things to change.
  4. I review each chapter separately through MS Word’s Spelling & Grammar, Grammarly, and ProWritingAid. (The last two are by subscription.)

This self-editing method is a multi-dimensional way to help me find errors I missed in past edits. It lets me look at my novel in three different ways:

  • paper copy
  • computer screen
  • through a software program

This self-editing method is designed for final drafts. I previously had my novel edited by a critique group and I paid a developmental editor. I realize I am getting more benefit from my current editing method.

My error is that I should have completed editing using this method before having another person look at my novel. I feel the advice from the critique group and the paid editor has been wasted since I am changing their edits to fit the changes I am making.

At least I’ll know for my next novel.

How to Write a Good Title

The title of anything is what people read first. For most writers, a title is also one of the hardest things to write.

When I’m trying to come up with a title for what I wrote, I spend maybe weeks or months hoping inspiration will strike. Surprisingly, it sometimes works. But, not often enough.

So, I use other techniques like writing down the five most important things about what was written. These could be names, objects, animals, or anything mentioned throughout the writing. After I have the five things, I get rid of two of them.

Next, I add in the two things that almost made the first list of five. Of course, this is just mixing words together different ways in the hope something appears to make sense. However, it also makes me think more about what is important in the story that should be in the title. Sometimes this works and a title pops out that I like. A lot of times, not.

Another technique I use is more logical. If the story is about two people, I put their names in the title with a description of the environment they exist in such as riding a train. These titles are sometimes okay.

While there are lots of opinions about this, I think short titles are not that good. The best titles are at least five to seven words. These are harder to write, yet tell more about what was written. A one or two word title does not say much.

Out of all of this, the single most important thing to writing a good title is taking the time to think about it. A title should be as important as what is written.

Being in a Writing Group

For almost a year, I’ve been president of a writer’s club. It’s been easy because the other board members have been an invaluable help. I’ve also been part of a critique group for several years. I encourage writers to get involved in a writer’s club and a critique group to connect with the writing community in their area and help improve their writing.

Of course, the wrong personalities can make joining a club or group a negative experience. I found these types of organizations few and easy to quit. The biggest challenge is finding a writers’ club or critique group to join.

Most communities do not have a club or group for writers. There are online ones, which I joined, too. However, the online life seems too impersonal and distant. I found meeting and interacting with people is better for my writing.

If there is no club or group, a writer could form a critique group which are small, informal, and focused on critiquing. Plus, there are lots of guidelines on how to do conduct this group. A club can be more complicated and formal with bylaws.

To start a critique group, a writer could go to the local library. Many writers come to the library seeking a group to join and libraries generally support writers. Another place to go is the English Department of a community college.

I recently went to a small writer’s conference where I met three students from the local community college. With no creative writing classes offered, they formed their own critique group with help from an English teacher. It quickly became several critique groups.

I have another year left as president. The club has been a great way to make connections with the writing community. Also, my critique group has been a great way to improve my writing. Writers should meet other writers.