Build the Project’s Funding First

Before I write a grant application, I build a spreadsheet with all of the project’s funding information (revenue and allocation or expense). I use the template pictured above. Once I know exactly what I’m funding, the writing goes a lot easier.

This template is only for a project, a subset of the organization’s mission. A foundation usually requests the nonprofit’s total budget as a separate attachment. Also, many foundations want to see operating funds separate from a project, not together. A grant application should be specific.

(Hint: many foundations fund a specific project rather than the more general operating funding.)

The critical part of building a project’s funding is the percentages. Foundations want to be a partner in a project, which generally means less than a fifty percent investment. What the percentage is depends on the foundation. I try not to go above thirty five percent in any category. But, this is only my guideline based on my opinion, which is not necessarily a good opinion or a valid guideline.

In any case, a nonprofit should be flexible when building a funding plan. Salaries can be included as long as they are for the project and the foundation allows salaries funding. If not, then I list salaries in Other Cash Support. Either way, I never have the foundation pay for the employee benefits. These costs give the impression of operating costs.

Besides the percentages, the other important part is the categories. The template has standard categories meant to be general, while being somewhat specific. Making things too specific can create confusion. A lot of foundations are okay with these categories.

Some foundations have their own budget template. I can complete their template with all the information from my spreadsheet. Plus, I have done the analysis that they may do to figure out how much of the project they are funding.

Writing a grant request is not easy. Getting the costs settled makes the writing less complicated. After all, it is mostly about the money.

Stories without a Published Home (showing half published, half not)

Sometimes after sending a story out for publishing and getting a lot of rejections, I decide enough is enough. For my sake and the story.

I feel guilty when I stop sending out a short story. It is a strange ending to what I created. No one will ever read it except me.

I keep my stories printed out and in manila folders. Inside on the left are magazines I sent the story to along with date and when it was rejected (or when I never heard back from the magazine).

One folder has red wine stains, another splotches of strong coffee, and still another drips from black tea. Some are peppered with food stains while others are not so anointed (it didn’t take as long to write them).

When I run out of room on the inside cover, I write the rejections on the back. At some point, I stop and file the folder and story away before I run out of room on the back and there’s nowhere else to go.

These stories I file away don’t sit far from the stories that were accepted. Maybe I’ll bring the old stories out and try again one day.

Special Grant Requests

As I posted before, nonprofits should always keep a conversation going with people who might support their mission. This year, I was involved in grant requests from two foundations. Both foundations solicited requests outside their application period and focus areas.

The first (foundation A) had a new director who wanted to expand the foundation’s area of interest. Maybe there were other internal motivations. The other (foundation B) received an unexpected endowment.

News for both grant requests came mostly through word-of-mouth. Foundation A representatives came to the area and attended meetings where they spread the word. Foundation B already had a grant request process, which had closed and decisions made. They notified those nonprofits who had applied.

Both foundations posted information on their websites listing what they fund, what they won’t, and guidelines. The normal stuff. However, this information was not complete and not really that clear.

I called foundation A and the administrator easily explained what they wanted in the application. Such as what to mail and who to address on the application. I also got some background information as to why this foundation was soliciting grant requests, which helped in the grant write up.

Foundation B had a special link on their submission webpage to get the application. However, the special focus areas meant several nonprofits would not qualify. Someone else made the call to the foundation and found out that everyone who applied under the regular application process was eligible, regardless of the special focus areas.

In both cases, everyone who found out about the special grant requests were eligible for money. Many nonprofits in the area did not apply either because they had not heard about these grant requests or never contacted the foundations to clarify what was required for the submission.

Lessons learned.

Leo Tolstoy’s “Art is an Infection”

Brenda Ueland wrote about Tolstoy in her 1938 book If You Want to Write. Tolstoy believed, “the artist has a feeling and he expresses it and at once this feeling infects other people and they have it, too.”

Ms. Ueland explained that when an artist exhibits feelings “honestly and courageously” onto a canvas, through music, in writing, or some other venue and means, the artist infects the creation with passion. Through this, the artist brings emotion to the viewer, listener, or reader who experiences it within themselves.

Is this what an artist should strive for? An infection of their feelings in their work? Or, should they just produce something that makes them money?

Of course, it is not possible for everyone to be infected by an artist’s work. Also, artists do not always succeed infecting their work with passion and honesty. Some don’t even try and see their work as a product to be sold.

This is all right because some buyers only want a distraction in their life or a decoration to be ignored. Besides, making something honestly and courageously takes time. An artist can make more products (and money) if they don’t spend a lot of effort in their creation.

It’s too bad because Ms. Ueland thought that, when an artist tells what they truly feel, the infection could become universal. “Everybody understands it and at once.” I think today we call that going viral.

I think an artist should strive, at least one time in their life, to create an art they will always love. Something they want the world to witness, an infection of their honesty and courageousness, passion and emotion. Even if it may not become a classic at first.