Starting a Young Writer’s Group

I got peered pressured into being president of my writing club. We have about 60 members, run a contest in the spring, hold monthly luncheon meetings with guest speakers, and sometimes a one day writing course. I’m fortunate to have board members who are great at helping me with the presidency and making my job easy. So, I decided to try starting a young writer’s group.

This is probably not a smart move on my part. First, I don’t know how to start a young writer’s group. Second, it will consume more of my time and could interfere with my afternoon (or morning) napping. Third, I need volunteers.

Some of the research I’ve done recommended not starting a writing group. Instead, I should help one that is already established. Except there are no young writers’ groups anywhere in eastern NC. There’re barely any writing groups at all.

I’ll start slow and just keep working at it. First, I need to pick the age group such as middle school, high schoolers, or community college students. Then, there’s the purpose for the group.

I think it will be to encourage writing, provide critiques, help members get published, and promote progress and accomplishments. I also hope to attract authors as mentors.

We’ll need a name and a place to meet regularly where we can have speakers. Of course, there is the issue of money.

Getting people to join, volunteers to help, and support from the community will take motivation. I don’t know what’s motivating me. Maybe when I do get a group going, I’ll figure that out, too.

The difference between a nonprofit’s paid staff and volunteer board members

A nonprofit has two groups who work toward meeting the mission goals. The Executive Director (ED) and maybe some staff workers run the daily operations. All are paid employees of the nonprofit.

Overseeing them are a board of directors made up of a President, Vice President, Secretary, and Treasurer. There could be other board members, too. All board members are volunteers with the board president being the ED’s boss.

Having a volunteer board overseeing a paid staff creates a unique relationship. People who volunteer to do a job and those who get paid for the job can have vastly different motivations for doing that job.

Both groups will have a sense of duty toward the success of the mission. Yet, they may see achieving that success based on what inspires them. Is it a personal feel-good of community service or a desire to pay the bills at home?

Both inspirations can be good or bad. They are just seeing the mission accomplishments in a way they believe based on why they are there.

I am a board member of a nonprofit. Although I see myself more of the grant writer than a board member. To write grants, I work with the Ed and paid staff. We all try to ignore that I’m a board member. Grant writers should avoid being a board member.

Instead, a grant writer should be aware of the different motivations between volunteering and being paid. This awareness is important when combined with people’s personalities and egos.

At a minimum, grant writers should meet regularly with the ED, talk to the board president, work with the nonprofit staff, and smile at the board members. Focus on the success of the mission. Everyone else is doing that, just maybe with a different purpose.

A Series or a Serial

I’m rewriting the ending of my book – again. I’m debating whether to end this book with a cliff hanger or not.

A cliff hanger means it has no ending and sets the stage for the next book, making them into serials. I will have to write follow-on books until I create an ending. No cliff hanger and I have an ending. If I write proceeding books, they become a series.

Sometimes, an author will break up a long book into smaller ones to make a serial and sell the books as a box set. It’s still one long book, it just gives the appearance of more manageable reading.

Other times, a writer cannot stop writing. One book leads to another and another as a serial. The never ending story. In both cases, a reader has to read all of the books in the correct order to understand the story and reach an ending, if there ever is one.

A series are stand-along books hosting the same characters within the same genre. Theoretically, these books can be read out of sequence, although I have rarely found this to be true. They build off each one, the characters change in some way, the environment they are in is altered somehow, or maybe minor characters become more prominent. Series are almost like a serial, just with an ending.

I don’t like serials, although some of the best books I’ve read were serials. Such as J.R.R. Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings. Another good series were the first three Star Wars movies (the best of all Star Wars).

I want to see an ending, which should make the decision for my book ending easy. Yet, the cliff hanger ending I came up with is much better than the ending I have.

Maybe I just don’t want to be committed to writing the next book. Although I’ve already started it.

Diversified Income

Nonprofits should receive money from as many different sources as possible. These sources include private donations, churches, other nonprofits, foundations, businesses, communities, fund raising events, and government agencies.

The more sources the better for a nonprofit since no source is a guaranteed income. However, it is not possible to work on all of these sources because each takes a certain amount of time and effort. Priority is needed.

Everything ends up being a choice of two methods. Getting a lot of money from a few sources or a little money from a lot of sources.

Getting a lot of money from a few sources means each request is generally long, complicated, and littered with traps. Competition is usually high with the funding organization wanting to trim out as many applications as possible using any excuse. Most of these sources are government agencies.

Using this method of few sources allows a nonprofit to focus more on these applications, giving them some upper level of chance. Yet, requesting a lot of money from a few places also means one denial can be catastrophic.

The other method of submitting to a lot of sources, means a lot more work. However, competition is usually lower and the submissions are not as cumbersome to complete.

This method requires being organized. There are more people to know and more time expended. However, one failure has a small impact. Also, getting a little from a lot means greater success since the source is not expending a large portion of their funds.

It all is a matter of personality. The first method is a greater risk with a higher payoff. The second method is less risk with a lower payoff.

Personally, I would always take the second method. It’s more work, but more assurance of success.